Tutankhamen … in Paris …

If you wish to spend a couple of pleasant hours while in Paris visit the Tutankhamen exhibition. Know that whatever you will see will be fakes, but all the same, you will not be disappointed. The exhibition which began on Saturday, May 12 and which runs through to Saturday September 1 inclusive is at Paris’s […]

If you wish to spend a couple of pleasant hours while in Paris visit the Tutankhamen exhibition.

Know that whatever you will see will be fakes, but all the same, you will not be disappointed.

The exhibition which began on Saturday, May 12 and which runs through to Saturday September 1 inclusive is at Paris’s exposition center at Porte de Versailles in the 15th arrondissement (district).

The exhibition – Toutankhamon, son tombeau et ses trésor – is a life-sized reconstitution of the tomb of King Tutankhamen (approx. 1341 BC – 1323 BC) as discovered in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings in 1922 by Howard Carter.

It is the creation of the Austrian-born and now Paris-based exhibition designer, architect and scenographer Rainer Verbizh.

Mr. Verbizh, a graduate of the Graz University of Technology, and his team from Atelier R. Verbizh began work on the reconstitution in 2006. With them worked the Egyptologists Dr. Martin von Falck and Dr. Wolfgang Wettengel.

I will allow you to read about Mr Verbizh yourself here.

A word about the Porte de Versailles Exhibition Center:

It is a vast complex of several buildings.

The Tutankhamen exhibition is in Hall 7. On entering the complex you turn left and after long rides on two escalators you will be in front of Hall 7. There is a café outside, so if you need to meet up with someone you could do so there.


It is not possible to individually walk through the exhibition. So once you are inside Hall 7, you will need to wait for a next group of visitors in order to enter the exhibition itself. (I worked out that a new group goes in every half an hour.)

The tour is broken up into three sections. For the first two you need head phones (available in French, English or German) as in each you will be watching a film on a very large screen but there is no sound track. Also note that there are view chairs to sit on in the first section, so if you need to sit try to get to the front of the queue.


You will be free to wander around the third section at your own pace. I found the third the most interesting. It is there where you will see the various objects from the tomb and this includes Tutankhamen’s coffin, or rather coffins.

You are allowed to take photos and videos but you won’t be allowed to use a flash.

There is a souvenir shop at the end of the exhibition (as always) but know that the objects are rather expensive.

Entry to the exhibition for an adult is €15.90 ($20 / £13). For a child, and this is great for children, is €12.90 ($16 / £10) Rather expensive I agree. One does not pay for the under five-year-olds.

It is open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. every day but Tuesday. However from July 1 it will be open on Tuesdays too.

Marilyn Z. Tomlins

2 Responses

5-28-2012 at 15:07:33

Thanks Marilyn, interesting and educational.

5-28-2012 at 15:39:31

Sadly I missed the real thing on three different occasions, each time just a bit too far away or not quite at the right time for us.

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Should you wish to contact me you can do so by email: marilyn@marilynztomlins.com